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Melvins – The Bootlicker

September 18, 2006

Sorry for the lack of updates on Thursday. I was pretty busy.

All things considered, the Melvins were responsible for a great deal of the grunge scene and are, although not known as so, one of the most influential acts of their age. And yet they sit in obscurity, just how they like it. I wholeheartedly enjoy Houdini for the heaviness if nothing else. To blare Hooch from my stereo is very enjoyable and satisfying. But there is always some kind of nagging feeling that if the band wanted to, they could probably produce something more poppy and outward. Of course, not anything close to pop really, but with a little more melodicism. I was expecting that with The Bootlicker, the second in a series of three albums on Ipecac around the turn of the century, the first being The Maggot and the third being The Crybaby. I was told that this album is where the Melvins strangeness and heaviness was manifested in a more open way. I guess that’s sort of true.

I am a tad disappointed by this purchase, I have to say. Granted, I haven’t heard either The Maggot or The Crybaby so I really only have one third of the intended picture. But I do think I have some kind of understanding of the album. It doesn’t present the Melvins in a more poppy way that the flower on the cover might suggest (the grunge scene really did have a thing with flowers, didn’t they?), but more a stripped down portrayal of an extremely heavy band with perhaps some accoustic guitars. The album in it’s entirety is very creepy and totally not what I was expecting from the band who made songs crafted more from anger and sludge than anything. Taking down the electronic walls does not reveal a more sensitive, enjoyable, and understanding band so much as a deeply disturbed, creepy, and paranoid band. You could easily pile on the guitars at this point and make all of the songs vintage Melvins, but instead they are all very different.

There are a few exceptions though. The only truly non-threatening part of the album is a later segment of Prig, which is a positively beautiful and almost, uh, cute (GASP!) little tune. At a few points, the band does sort of break out of their shell and bring forth a cool hook or something, but for the most part the album is covered in fog, what used to be sludge, slime, and grime. Part of Mary Lady Bobby Kins and Up The Dumper reveal some creepy realities, that while melodicism might be in the bands vocabulary, they have no interest in pursuing the concept without a little of their signature creep in the mix. And as soon as you think the positive attitude could go somewhere, it’s gone. For the most part, the rest of the album is creepy stuff. The song at the front of the pack, Toy, is utterly creepy and atmospheric, and sort of sets the tone for the rest of the album, which is essentailly a disk full of disturbing slow bass and high-hat oriented grooves.

I guess…stand out tracks might include Let It All Be, but it’s nothing you would want on a playlist. Although the track does explore the elusive groove that The Melvins aren’t too bad at delivering and is good background tunage for an urban nightime setting, the song is segmented into another macabre blurb. One thing that this album REALLY has to be desired is organization. Many times, more than one big idea is crammed into a song, and I think that they could have just as easily segmented everything and the album would be a lot less annoying. Out of all the grime, I’d say Black Santa, is one of the more accomplished pieces. It is rather reminiscent of a spaghetti western in some way, maybe if there were more zombies than Native Americans. Fans will find Up The Dumper hilarious. And if prig was decorated with more towering heavy guitars it would be a Melvins classic, at least if the first part. But instead it’s another segmented piece ruined a little by the variation. It is silly and fun in some perverse way nonetheless. And the accoustic guitar part is enough to baffle and bring a twinkle to even the most hardcore fans eyes.

I probably regret buying this album. And yet I can’t help but smile when I see it on my CD rack. There is something proud about it that I can’t explain. I think it probably did what it set out to do and I think it would please the fans pretty well. However, I’m not really a full-fledged fan, so I can’t really say that this was worth the price I paid for it. You can flip on some of the songs for good background music, and there are some more essential tracks on here, but the bottom line is, this is The Melvins in a completely different yet surprisingly confident setting.

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