Posts Tagged ‘Electronic’

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Beach House – White Moon / Mathemagic and Young Prisms

August 24, 2010

Check out this lovely new Beach House joint from their iTunes Sessions EP.

Beach House

Also, check out possibly the best post yet on Altered Zones, two new songs from Mathemagic and Young Prisms on their new split 7″. The Mathemagic side is a shimmering electronic pop song, maybe in the realm of chillwave. The Young Prisms side is a woozy, reverb-laden ballad. Both are dreamy and excellent.

Mathemagic/Young Prisms Split 7"

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New Gold Panda: Snow & Taxis

August 12, 2010

Gold Panda - Lucky Shiner

You’ve already heard the new single “You,” and now here’s another track from Gold Panda’s upcoming album Lucky Shiner. Not gonna lie, I’m getting really excited for this one. He keeps on cranking out really unique and memorable tracks, so when the full album drops on October 12, expect a big splash. This track closely resembles Kompact minimal techno, and it’s really just as amazing as “You” and “Quitters Raga.”

Gold Panda

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June 5, 2010

Some good electronic stuff I’ve heard lately…

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Guido - Anidea

Guido dropped his debut album Anidea the other day, and Andrew Gaerig of Pitchfork called it “one of the finest post-dubstep full lengths yet.” They’ve been throwing the label around for a while, and some people I know laughed at it. What does it even mean, really? Isn’t it a bit too soon, considering we’re still sorting through dubstep, to call something post-dubstep? At first I scoffed too, but I thought about how the genre has advanced. Like Burial and Clubroot, Guido doesn’t quite sound like run-of-the-mill dubstep, not the kind that the dubstep DJs play anyway. But it fits the description perfectly: clattering heartbeat-speed beats, warbly bass tones, and atmospheric sampling make Anidea sound like a familiar dubstep album, but there are aspects of it that sound departed from the typical formula. The cinematic strings on the closing “Tantalized” are a good start; they are just one example of the many sample choices that give Guido his unique rhythm throughout the record. But Anidea is hardly a reactionary record. Above all, Guido specializes in locking into a rhythm and holding a groove for long periods of time. He does this particularly well on the album’s two vocal tracks, “Beautiful Complication” featuring Aarya and “Way U Make Me Feel” featuring Yolanda. The latter in particular is a killer track, retro but also futuristic. This album is loaded with goodies, so if you’re into electronic music, dubstep or not, definitely check it out.

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Onra - Long Distance

Another label that’s been thrown around a lot at Pitchfork lately is post-Dilla. Using the phrase acknowledges a couple things, first and foremost being that J Dilla was a turning point in hip hop and electronic music, but also implying that Dilla influenced a lot of artists. Both of these claims probably hold truth. James Yancey’s style and body of work felt revelatory when they came out, and although it’s hard (at least for me) to namecheck DJs that take cues from him, it’s easy to hear his production value fingerprints here and there, and see his work being important not just now, but in the future. We can relate Dilla’s sound to French producer Onra’s earlier work in some key ways; 2007’s Chinoiseries, which contained only Chinese sample sources, featured cut-up vocal sampling and obscure vinyl melody-scrounging. The results were a little less earth-shaking, but the similarity is there. Now Onra is returning with another totally different LP, a future-shocked funk record called Long Distance. It still bears a resemblance in many ways of Dilla, but people who may have been following electronic and beatmaking music will immediately be reminded of Dam-Funk’s massive double album Toeachizown released in 2009. It reminisces of 80’s synth-funk while celebrating the new, ear-popping way of doing things in hip hop, and consequently we have a fusion of music that is both interesting and classy. At the very least, Onra sounds like he’s having a lot of fun here. The vocal tracks here really shine- in particular, “The One” featuring T3 of Slum Village showcases his abilities to step out of the limelight for an MC while sustaining his intelligent production work. Onra is an artist who simultaneously does a lot of interesting things without compromising any of them, and Long Distance is subsequently an album that sounds accomplished and assured, for whatever genre it’s in.

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Oval - Oh EP

Markus Popp has always refused to follow conventions in songwriting and musical production since the earliest Oval works in the early ’90s, and his tireless creativity brought us brilliant albums like 94 Diskont which challenged the the way that people listened to music. The proposition of a new Oval release is enough to make glitch fans giddy just because of what it is, but Oh is exciting enough to earn its reputation. And for a whole new audience at that; Oh is not only a great glitch release but also a great electronic release, broad in its endeavors. First and foremost it sounds melodic, much moreso than than earlier Oval releases, and each of the fifteen songs has recognizable, though highly warped, tunes. Only two songs break two minutes, the rest keeping things very short as small musical vignettes. The two longer songs are particularly accomplished. The opening “hey” is wonderfully catchy and rhythmic, using some live instrumentation alongside warped synthesizers. “grrr” is more subdued, almost ambient in its progression. It is relaxing, sometimes sounding like free jazz while also sounding avant garde and contemporary, not unlike Music is Rotted One Note era Squarepusher. Most of the shorter songs are quite enjoyable too, abstractly melodic and quiet. All this makes for an all-around solid full listen, a lot to take in from an artist who has a lot of catching up to do with his fans. Perhaps what is even more exciting about the Oh EP is that it precipitates Oval’s upcoming full-length album, O, which will have some seventy tracks. If the modus operandi of Oh carries over, then we have a feast of mini glitch masterpieces to look forward to.

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2010 Rocks

May 26, 2010

So, folks, it’s been just about a month since I last gave a big summary of my favorite albums of Q1 of 2010, and I’ve already heard a slew of new, awesome music. 2010 has been an incredible year for music so far, and here’s some more great albums.

I’ve provided youtube samples, but do know that their sound quality is going to be a lot lower than the actual recordings. I’d really recommend getting the albums if you like what you hear.

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Clubroot - II:MMX

I admit to not being an ardent follower of dubstep in general, though I do dip into the genre on occasion. Anyone who knows me knows that I pretty much listen to Burial every day of my life, and I got pretty excited about the Luvstep mix earlier this year, and hell, I would just about never turn the stuff off if I ever heard it on the radio (never have). So I’m not beyond getting excited about a good dubstep release, and this new album by Dan Richmond, known as Clubroot, might be the prime example of the second most intelligent dubstep producer that I’ve heard (all due respect to those I haven’t). Clubroot’s sound is slow, deliberate and contemplative, and creates one hell of an aural environment of atmospheric dubstep; echoing synths and string samples hover in the air over visceral and subtly groovy dubstep beats. The result are melancholy mood pieces, and though they take a while to develop, once your ears are attuned to them it is easy to get addicted. The first Clubroot album last year was tasty, but II:MMX takes the style to the next level with cleaner production and more memorable melodies. No one is going to pretend that Dan Richmond is trying to push things forward half as much as William Bevan, but we’re still all the better for his excursions.

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LM1 - Blue Mountain EP

I’ll preface my next recommendation with yet another claim of ignorance; I may not know drum ‘n bass in and out, but I know good drum ‘n bass when I hear it. The Blue Mountain EP by LM1 is such music, energizing and completely smart. LM1 is the work of Allan Cowie, and it’s apparent that he is the master of the breakbeat. The beats themselves are propulsive but in no way intrusive, and the atmospheric touches he brings to his songs do a lot with a little. Ambient flourishes give the tracks on this EP a lot of volume. Particularly, the title track matches its title and creates a vast, expansive sound world with ambient textures. The other tracks are just as strong, slowly developing but fast moving ear candy for electronic fans. The big question: where did this come from? Well, it turns out LM1 is the founder and owner of Offworld Recordings, which he created after releasing a string of recordings on other record labels. Offworld already has four releases from a multitude of artists, and it turns out they rule too. The Blue Mountain EP has blown the top off of this exciting new project, and you can be sure that we’ll have coverage on all of it soon. In the meantime, go here for more information as well as an Offworld showcase, which indicates that this is truly the new revival of drum ‘n bass.

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Sleigh Bells - Treats

How old am I again? Well I feel like I’m about fifty five, scowling at legions of young music aficionados about how despite the fact that there is a lot of cool stuff going on in music at the dawn of this new decade, the fact stands that rock music just isn’t cool anymore and these kids don’t know what they’re missing. Sleigh Bells’ music may still be pop at its heart, but it rejuvenates the lost concept that it’s really cool to be really fucking loud. And loud Treats is. Blisteringly loud. The guitars cut like razors and their drums sound like running giants. The volume is going to be the first thing most anyone notices about the vast majority of these songs, but like Psychocandy before it, the noise encases a really down to earth pop album. The heart of this concept is heard most apparently on the sublimely jangly “Rill Rill,” which is Treats‘ most obvious accomplishment because it lacks the sheer volume that the rest of the tracks have. It’s slightly distorted and rough around the edges, but above all else it’s delicious pop music. The keystone of the album, it makes the other tracks seem less violent and more good-natured. You can tell “Crown on the Ground” wants to be on Kid’s Bop, but it got rejected because it had tourettes. “Tell ‘Em” was to be a high school fight song, but it got mangleded in a car accident. They’re fractured pop songs that you can more than relate to and side with, because despite the fact that they will destroy your cochleae, they just sound right.

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Flying Lotus - Cosmogramma

Steven Ellison, known as Flying Lotus, made one of the best records of 2008, Los Angeles. It is just a fact, and one that I have taken a few years to come to grips with and fully appreciate. In electronic music, it’s easy to see Flying Lotus becoming an important figure, and so it’s easy to see a new FlyLo album as an important occurrence. Cosmogramma pulls together an environment as rich in style as Los Angeles, with many notable aspects: Lots of live instrumentation, strong jazz elements, strings and harps, and a sense of mysticism. Also notable: while many of Los Angeles’ beats trailed behind bars by fractions of seconds, on Cosmogramma those beats lead the measures at a similarly minute speed, which makes for an album that is fully excited and running at a high speed but never trips over itself, because it is in the hands of a master. And as usual, there is a slew of sounds here that you would never find anywhere else. Describing those moments are almost impossible, but they stand for themselves; the super high frequency “Nose Art,” the free jazz experimental “Arkestry,” the awesome collaboration with Thom York on “…And the World Laughs With You,” and the heavy “Recoiled” are just a few such highlights, but they by no means stop there. This is yet another truly important electronic record from an artist with incredible talent. The future of music clearly lies with this man, and with that said, the future always seems to be bright.

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Autechre - Oversteps

Electronic producers Rob Brown and Sean Booth have been making music as Autechre for about twenty years now, and their new album Oversteps is their tenth. Throughout their flabbergasting career arc, they have invented, reinvented and refined not only their sound but contemporary progressive electronic music as a whole. Anyone who knows albums like Tri Repetae and LP5 know that a new Autechre album means a whole new world of sound, and Oversteps is no exception. The album is filled with jittery, mysterious productions, and it shows the group at their most melodic state since 1998’s LP5 (with the exception of several moments on 2008’s great Quaristice). A lot of times, and as is certainly the case for Oversteps, Autechre songs have sleeper qualities, puzzling at first and then later sinking in for heavy thinking. It stands that being an Autechre fan is incredibly awarding. In their ten album and twelve EP (give or take) career, they have crafted just about every song into its own sonic world, and with each album have built unshakable statements. Oversteps initially feels like a strong, logical progression. It’s possible that if it is given time, the yeast will rise and it will stand even taller. But what’s even more exciting and puzzling than these tracks is that Autechre are set to release another album this year. Move of Ten is due out on July 12, and a quick examination of the cover art certainly makes me surmise that the new album may be a companion piece to Oversteps. What that means is that we may still only have part of the full picture here, and thus Oversteps as well as Move of Ten may have new developments to explore.

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The National - High Violet

I have missed The National’s live show twice. I traded their show at Lollapalooza 2008 for a good spot at Nine Inch Nails, and their show at Pitchfork last year for a set from The Black Lips. At the time I wasn’t sad about having to make those choices at all. The National were always a band that were pleasant enough, had a specific style that I’m sometimes in the mood for, and made a handful of really cool songs that I liked a lot. But the fact stood that The National, in general, just bored me. It’s only now that High Violet has come out that I’m finally kicking myself for missing them and really getting excited about seeing them at Lollapalooza this year. Don’t get me wrong – the National have always been a good band, but High Violet really brings them above and beyond. A lot of these tracks are immediate National classics. The excellent first single “Bloodbuzz Ohio,” with its dramatic lyrics and melancholy atmosphere that the band are known for, only scrapes the surface of this album’s highlights. “Sorrow,” “Anyone’s Ghost” and “England” in particular show the band locking in and delivering some of their most savory, melodic moments on any of their five albums. High Violet is the work of a band that has had years to build, refine and experiment with their sound. Admittedly, High Violet and it’s overall sound are very similar stylistically to what The National has done before with such successful albums as Alligator and Boxer, but if you’re into this band, this may be their best album yet.

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Gold Panda – You

April 10, 2010

Sick new track from London Producer Gold Panda. Check it out.

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Best New Music: Q1 in Review

April 9, 2010

We’ve finally entered Q2 of 2010, so I thought I’d revisit some of the best music I’ve heard this year so far.

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Beach House put out the best record of the year so far, Teen Dream. What we at Radio Cure call “beach pop” has been surging in popularity within the past year and a half and it all came down to Beach House’s third album release. It’s a doozie, romantic pop perfection. Buy it or may God have mercy on your soul.

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Another one of the best beach pop releases of the year is the Something in the Way single by Best Coast. It’s a magical, pristine pop song that harkens back to ’60s rockabilly. Best Coast hasn’t released a full album quite yet, but they’ve been making huge splashes on the blogosphere with their great one-off songs, so definitely check them out.

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Apparently even major label pop music is jumping on the beach pop bandwagon; Gorillaz recently released their oceanic third album Plastic Beach. It delivers in much the same way that their previous albums have, churning many great hip hop and rock tunes with a guest list nothing short of incredible. Damon Albarn and company continue to prove that major label acts can still deliver truly vital albums.

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Grouper and Roy Montgomery put out a Split EP on the first day of the year that rivals other releases this year in terms of inventiveness. On Roy Montgomery’s side, epic, ambient middle-eastern guitar strumming. On Grouper’s side, wistful, understated melodies. Both are gorgeous.

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Four Tet put out the stellar There Is Love in You in January, maybe the best electronic album since Flying Lotus’ Los Angeles. It’s minimal techno at its biggest and most physical, influenced by Hebden’s work with Burial. Hebden still has a way with organic sound and makes another dazzling album to fascinate until the next one.

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The Knife along with Mt. Sims and Planningtorock put together the sprawling, progressive Tomorrow, in a Year, the opera based on the life of Charles Darwin as well as the history of the earth. It is difficult, abrasive and also incredibly beautiful and brilliant. If you’re up for a challenge, give it a listen.

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Finally, Gil Scott-Heron released I’m New Here, his first new album in fifteen years, on XL. It’s unlike anything I’ve heard before, a moving mix of Scott-Heron’s strong vocals, post-industrial production, spoken word and awesome cover songs. If you are into poetry or want an eclectic set of tracks, this is a must-have.

What have YOU been listening to?

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The Return of Youtube Corner: Gang Gang Dance – Crystals

March 4, 2010

Gang Gang are coming to the Rock n Roll Hotel in DC on March 30th and hopefully I’ll be seeing them. Last time they rocked and I have high hopes for this time too. For those of you who haven’t been following them, they recently signed to 4AD, and we can logically assume that new material is in the works. This is a classic Gang jam, ambient/dreampop clouds of sound and ethnic rhythms, topped with entrancing electronics. If their new material includes or is anything like Crystals, the new Gang Gang Dance album is definitely something to watch out for. And remember, Saint Dymphna was one of the best albums of not just 2008 but the whole damn decade, so their standards are already high. Enjoy and keep an eye out.

Gang Gang Dance

ATB