Posts Tagged ‘Pop’

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Cee Lo – Fuck You

August 27, 2010

This has been rocking the internet for a week or two, but if you haven’t heard it yet, brace yourself for one of the catchiest pseudo-pop songs you’ll ever hear. Classic. Just make sure your kids aren’t around when you play this one. Cee Lo’s new album The Lady Killer drops on October 4.

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2010 Rocks

May 26, 2010

So, folks, it’s been just about a month since I last gave a big summary of my favorite albums of Q1 of 2010, and I’ve already heard a slew of new, awesome music. 2010 has been an incredible year for music so far, and here’s some more great albums.

I’ve provided youtube samples, but do know that their sound quality is going to be a lot lower than the actual recordings. I’d really recommend getting the albums if you like what you hear.

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Clubroot - II:MMX

I admit to not being an ardent follower of dubstep in general, though I do dip into the genre on occasion. Anyone who knows me knows that I pretty much listen to Burial every day of my life, and I got pretty excited about the Luvstep mix earlier this year, and hell, I would just about never turn the stuff off if I ever heard it on the radio (never have). So I’m not beyond getting excited about a good dubstep release, and this new album by Dan Richmond, known as Clubroot, might be the prime example of the second most intelligent dubstep producer that I’ve heard (all due respect to those I haven’t). Clubroot’s sound is slow, deliberate and contemplative, and creates one hell of an aural environment of atmospheric dubstep; echoing synths and string samples hover in the air over visceral and subtly groovy dubstep beats. The result are melancholy mood pieces, and though they take a while to develop, once your ears are attuned to them it is easy to get addicted. The first Clubroot album last year was tasty, but II:MMX takes the style to the next level with cleaner production and more memorable melodies. No one is going to pretend that Dan Richmond is trying to push things forward half as much as William Bevan, but we’re still all the better for his excursions.

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LM1 - Blue Mountain EP

I’ll preface my next recommendation with yet another claim of ignorance; I may not know drum ‘n bass in and out, but I know good drum ‘n bass when I hear it. The Blue Mountain EP by LM1 is such music, energizing and completely smart. LM1 is the work of Allan Cowie, and it’s apparent that he is the master of the breakbeat. The beats themselves are propulsive but in no way intrusive, and the atmospheric touches he brings to his songs do a lot with a little. Ambient flourishes give the tracks on this EP a lot of volume. Particularly, the title track matches its title and creates a vast, expansive sound world with ambient textures. The other tracks are just as strong, slowly developing but fast moving ear candy for electronic fans. The big question: where did this come from? Well, it turns out LM1 is the founder and owner of Offworld Recordings, which he created after releasing a string of recordings on other record labels. Offworld already has four releases from a multitude of artists, and it turns out they rule too. The Blue Mountain EP has blown the top off of this exciting new project, and you can be sure that we’ll have coverage on all of it soon. In the meantime, go here for more information as well as an Offworld showcase, which indicates that this is truly the new revival of drum ‘n bass.

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Sleigh Bells - Treats

How old am I again? Well I feel like I’m about fifty five, scowling at legions of young music aficionados about how despite the fact that there is a lot of cool stuff going on in music at the dawn of this new decade, the fact stands that rock music just isn’t cool anymore and these kids don’t know what they’re missing. Sleigh Bells’ music may still be pop at its heart, but it rejuvenates the lost concept that it’s really cool to be really fucking loud. And loud Treats is. Blisteringly loud. The guitars cut like razors and their drums sound like running giants. The volume is going to be the first thing most anyone notices about the vast majority of these songs, but like Psychocandy before it, the noise encases a really down to earth pop album. The heart of this concept is heard most apparently on the sublimely jangly “Rill Rill,” which is Treats‘ most obvious accomplishment because it lacks the sheer volume that the rest of the tracks have. It’s slightly distorted and rough around the edges, but above all else it’s delicious pop music. The keystone of the album, it makes the other tracks seem less violent and more good-natured. You can tell “Crown on the Ground” wants to be on Kid’s Bop, but it got rejected because it had tourettes. “Tell ‘Em” was to be a high school fight song, but it got mangleded in a car accident. They’re fractured pop songs that you can more than relate to and side with, because despite the fact that they will destroy your cochleae, they just sound right.

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Flying Lotus - Cosmogramma

Steven Ellison, known as Flying Lotus, made one of the best records of 2008, Los Angeles. It is just a fact, and one that I have taken a few years to come to grips with and fully appreciate. In electronic music, it’s easy to see Flying Lotus becoming an important figure, and so it’s easy to see a new FlyLo album as an important occurrence. Cosmogramma pulls together an environment as rich in style as Los Angeles, with many notable aspects: Lots of live instrumentation, strong jazz elements, strings and harps, and a sense of mysticism. Also notable: while many of Los Angeles’ beats trailed behind bars by fractions of seconds, on Cosmogramma those beats lead the measures at a similarly minute speed, which makes for an album that is fully excited and running at a high speed but never trips over itself, because it is in the hands of a master. And as usual, there is a slew of sounds here that you would never find anywhere else. Describing those moments are almost impossible, but they stand for themselves; the super high frequency “Nose Art,” the free jazz experimental “Arkestry,” the awesome collaboration with Thom York on “…And the World Laughs With You,” and the heavy “Recoiled” are just a few such highlights, but they by no means stop there. This is yet another truly important electronic record from an artist with incredible talent. The future of music clearly lies with this man, and with that said, the future always seems to be bright.

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Autechre - Oversteps

Electronic producers Rob Brown and Sean Booth have been making music as Autechre for about twenty years now, and their new album Oversteps is their tenth. Throughout their flabbergasting career arc, they have invented, reinvented and refined not only their sound but contemporary progressive electronic music as a whole. Anyone who knows albums like Tri Repetae and LP5 know that a new Autechre album means a whole new world of sound, and Oversteps is no exception. The album is filled with jittery, mysterious productions, and it shows the group at their most melodic state since 1998’s LP5 (with the exception of several moments on 2008’s great Quaristice). A lot of times, and as is certainly the case for Oversteps, Autechre songs have sleeper qualities, puzzling at first and then later sinking in for heavy thinking. It stands that being an Autechre fan is incredibly awarding. In their ten album and twelve EP (give or take) career, they have crafted just about every song into its own sonic world, and with each album have built unshakable statements. Oversteps initially feels like a strong, logical progression. It’s possible that if it is given time, the yeast will rise and it will stand even taller. But what’s even more exciting and puzzling than these tracks is that Autechre are set to release another album this year. Move of Ten is due out on July 12, and a quick examination of the cover art certainly makes me surmise that the new album may be a companion piece to Oversteps. What that means is that we may still only have part of the full picture here, and thus Oversteps as well as Move of Ten may have new developments to explore.

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The National - High Violet

I have missed The National’s live show twice. I traded their show at Lollapalooza 2008 for a good spot at Nine Inch Nails, and their show at Pitchfork last year for a set from The Black Lips. At the time I wasn’t sad about having to make those choices at all. The National were always a band that were pleasant enough, had a specific style that I’m sometimes in the mood for, and made a handful of really cool songs that I liked a lot. But the fact stood that The National, in general, just bored me. It’s only now that High Violet has come out that I’m finally kicking myself for missing them and really getting excited about seeing them at Lollapalooza this year. Don’t get me wrong – the National have always been a good band, but High Violet really brings them above and beyond. A lot of these tracks are immediate National classics. The excellent first single “Bloodbuzz Ohio,” with its dramatic lyrics and melancholy atmosphere that the band are known for, only scrapes the surface of this album’s highlights. “Sorrow,” “Anyone’s Ghost” and “England” in particular show the band locking in and delivering some of their most savory, melodic moments on any of their five albums. High Violet is the work of a band that has had years to build, refine and experiment with their sound. Admittedly, High Violet and it’s overall sound are very similar stylistically to what The National has done before with such successful albums as Alligator and Boxer, but if you’re into this band, this may be their best album yet.

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Best Coast

February 21, 2010

Best Coast

If you listened to Radio Cure last night, you caught me and Joey gushing over a new band on our now somewhat regular segment of “Beach Pop” as we call it, the new scene of music on the indie horizon which features sunny, ocean-bound pop music. We’ve seen a lot of it within the past year or two making a splash in independent music from the likes of Beach House, Real Estate, jj and more, including now this lovely artist Bethany Cosentino, known widely as Best Coast.

When Joey first played Best Coast to me, I immediately thought of the syrupy fuzz of the Vivian Girls, and it was exciting to find out that the two bands are currently touring the West Coast together. But the Vivians use similar means to reach a quite different ends, having championed a unique style of garage punk that has been more divisive than nearly any other band in recent history. Best Coast seems a little harder to dislike than the edgy Vivians, mostly because the innocence and lack of pretense in her music is even more apparent. She crafts lovely lo-fi West Coast pop music in the vein of The Ronettes that wouldn’t sound out of place on the American Graffiti soundtrack.

Best coast have only released a few singles and EPs so far, but their output is already home to a small treasure trove of pop classics. They’re the kind of tunes that you hold onto and don’t want to let go of, the songs that you put on repeat because you hate the thought of them ending even though you know that they need to, songs with melodies that sound like splashes of bright paint and clear ocean water. Take “Something in the Way,” an irresistible bittersweet heartbreaker, or the astute “This is Real,” love songs with tearjerking hitches. Does it get better?

Their material is sparse, so seeking them out is completely easy and enjoyable. If you like what you hear, do a little more searching on Hype Machine.

Something in the Way

Art Fag 7"

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Beach House – Teen Dream

February 1, 2010

Teen Dream

Is it possible that Beach House started all of this beach-combing nostalgia? Granted, the “Beach-Pop” scene is still a new, developing niche, but it feels like Beach House have been around forever, spinning tales of love and loss as waves erode the shore. In actuality, it has been less than five years and only three albums, but now and more than ever it is apparent that the Baltimore duo have staying power. The band’s new album Teen Dream was released last week to booming critical reception, and this is a rare time when you’ll hear me tell you to believe the hype and give the album a shot regardless of your opinions on prior Beach House releases; it is a clutch release that sets out to prove a lot and does so with flying colors. If there has ever been a time to believe that the genre of seaside dreampop drawn into the sand by the likes of jj, Real Estate, Delorean, recent Grizzly Bear, and Beach House could really lift off, that time is now, with Beach House quickly gaining altitude as one of indie pop’s most beloved bands.

One of the most convincing, immediate factors of Beach House’s new maelstrom of critical praise is vocalist Victoria Legrand’s delivery, which only becomes more and more convincing with each release. First single choice “Norway” expands upon the one-word-chorus heroics of “Gila” off of 2008’s Devotion. It’s hard to imagine Legrand wringing any more emotion out of two syllables, snaking vowel sounds through complex melodies with greatly varying textures. At some moments she sounds like an orator and at others a crying child. Similarly showstopping is the second to last song, “Real Love,” which comes in the middle of one of the greatest one-two-three punch knockout endings in recent recollection. Over the sound of someone searching through antiques in the basement, Legrand sings “I met you somewhere in a hell beneath the stairs/There’s someone in that room that frightens you when they go boom/boom, boom, boom…” Once again, just listen to Legrand’s repetition of that single syllable, bringing both her and us nearly to tears before she lifts us up with the gorgeous closer “Take Care,” with the album’s most timeless lyrics: “I’ll take care of you, take care of you, that’s true.” The song sounds ancient, even though it is an early highlight of the new year.

But “Used to Be” is actually, as far as I know, the oldest track on the album, having been released as its own single way back in 2008, and its progress represents Beach House’s growth since Devotion. In single form, it felt like a slight departure from Devotion but with a very similar sound. It was possibly the most melancholy song we’d heard from the band yet, and it had an awful lot of competition. Legrand wistfully inquires “Are you coming home?/Are you still alone?/Are you not the same as you used to be?” like she really doesn’t know the answers, and the track features electric guitars that cut like knives from the other half of the group, multi-instrumentalist Alex Scally. It fizzles out, unresolved, after a lengthy, painful outro (“Even if we tried so hard, would we still be coming to an end?”) and some whispered, nearly unintelligible mutterings. The original single take of “Used to Be” is a rarity, presenting heartbreak in equal parts of delicate consideration and ugly dejection. At this point it seemed like Beach House were at the height of their powers, just about at the fringes of being able to make their audience, with great certainty, cry their eyes out, just because it felt so damn real.

With that said, what Beach House have done with the new version of “Used to Be” is less of a step forward and more of a step upward. Despite argument to the contrary, Beach House didn’t come to the table with a fully formed sound. One refined into its lowest common denominator, sure, we can agree on that, but as 2008’s Devotion and now 2010’s Teen Dream have proved, Beach House have had a long way to go since they started so many years ago, a long way until they could have made a song like the final cut of “Used to Be.” At about 1:15 of the new version, the swooning, dreamy passion that the old version flirted with is taken all the way by a slightly changed chorus, a wash of cymbals and a thick kick drum. All of a sudden, the song is bursting with life and energy; it even sounds like Legrand can barely catch her breath. Although the new version is about the same BPM as the original, it sounds infinitely more vivacious. The transformation is completed with new outro lyrics: “Coming home, any day now…” It’s easy to think, “Ah! So THAT’S how it’s supposed to sound” at this point.

The entire album is filled with moments like this, where Beach House’s stylistic advances really shine and it becomes apparent how hard they have worked and far they have come. The self-harmonized vocals on “Zebra” breath life into an already shimmering melody that cleverly starts the album off on an ending note. “10 Mile Stereo,” the first song in the aforementioned power trio, takes the band’s tempo to the highest its ever been and its guitar tones even higher, nearly reaching shoegaze levels of reverberation, and throws in an incredible ending cymbal solo. “Silver Soul” is most haunting use of the words “it is happening again” that I have heard since “Blue Sky Revisit.” At this time, I should probably point out that while Teen Dream is a gorgeous album, it also has its dark moments, like their previous albums. My cousin, who is usually into industrial thrash, found “Astronaut” from Devotion a compelling listen. He’d probably find Teen Dream to be more than haunting; it glazes over none of its ugly or painful moments whatsoever. It presents its love and pain in equal esteem, creating a full, balanced, bittersweet end product.

Teen Dream is a tremendous, momentous album, but what is more amazing is that it is easy to see it gaining even more momentum as time goes on. It already sounds like finely aged wine, Legrand and Scally having developed an unmistakable style that they have carried a very long way and have taken to new and exciting places on Teen Dream. When Devotion came out, it made the band’s 2006 self-titled debut sound ancient, and “Aburn and Ivory” still calls out like a dynamic ’60s dirge ala Jefferson Airplane. Teen Dream does much the same thing for Devotion, making the likes of “You Came to Me” and “Home Again” sound like established standards of this new thing I called “Beach-Pop.” We can be rest assured that Teen Dream, as Beach House’s finest album to date, will enter that same realm, and soon enough it will be the kind of album we can rest our heads against and sing along with while drifting into a deep sleep.

Also, check out the band’s new Daytrotter Session.

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Off This Century – My Favorite Albums of 2000-2009

December 25, 2009
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Mew – No More Stories / Are Told Today / I'm Sorry / They Washed Away // No More Stories / The World Is Grey / I'm Tired / Let's Wash Away

September 12, 2009

I don’t have a lot of energy right now, as it is late and I am back late from a show, but I am now listening to this album and feel that it deserves a shout out. So I’m going to give my incomplete, unedited take on it.

mew_no_more_stories

As the year progresses, more and more albums are catching my ear that impress me. I’ll be blunt by saying that No More Stories… is one of those albums. It is different from Mew’s previous LP, And The Glass Handed Kites (which, man, came out four years ago already?) in that it is very much a set of songs as opposed to a long suite. Each song is individual and memorable. This is due in part to Mew’s frequent tendency to experiment a little, and thus we get songs like “New Terrain” (which when played backwards reveals a completely different song. what’s shocking is that both songs are actually good), “Introducing Palace Players” (a fractured, no-tempo stomp), and “Cartoons and Macrame Wounds” (which begins at it’s climax and works backwards). These songs are pretty out there at first listen, but give them a little time and the pieces click into place and they are ultimately enticing. They are just new and different enough to be fascinating but they also have more conventional, melodic elements to them, and Mew are very good at melody. The album isn’t all experimentalism though; there are a couple more streamlined tunes here, but they aren’t by any means radio pop. “Repeaterbeater” reminisces of “Apocalypso” off of Glass Handed Kites in that it is shamelessly riffy hard rock. I’ll put another thing bluntly. This album is loaded. It’s got a lot of really memorable songs, and really no bad songs. Even the longer, downtempo pieces (“Silas the Magic Car,” “Cartoons and Macrame Wounds”) are top notch chamber dream pop despite being a little less involving. After maybe two listens, everything here is as familiar and excellent sounding as on Mew’s previous albums. The selection of songs that are excellent here is pretty overwhelming. Besides what I’ve already mentioned, “Beach,” “Hawaii Dream” (the album’s centerpiece, a tiny interlude. how funny that it ends up being one of the more memorable tracks on the album.), “Hawaii” (this one is just perfect, a charming tropical pop song complete with marimbas and skybound reverberating vocals), and “Sometimes Life Isn’t Easy” are all instantly classic Mew. And on the latter, Mew manage to match their awesome guest spot from J Mascis on Glass Handed Kites’ “Why Are You Looking Grave” with a showstopping performance from Mari Helgerlikova, an 88 year old Danish avant-garde singer. Basically, get this album for Christ’s sake. Mew make music that is, like much great art, just new and interesting enough to be engaging, but isn’t too far out. They are completely unabashed in their pop and rock sensibilities while still having the bravery to utilize conventions of many of their favorite genres such as shoegaze, dream pop, progressive rock and even classical pop. You could make a pretty good case that this is Mew’s best album to date. I can hear the complaint already that some might think that this album is tired, but it aknowledges this in it’s title, and knows it. Life can be weary and overbearing but finding refuge in quality music, whether it is music you can rock out to or curl up on the couch with, is pure satisfaction.

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Asobi Seksu – Hush

March 23, 2009
Asobi Seksu - Hush

Asobi Seksu - Hush

Asobi Seksu are a band that has claimed many adjectives. Their self-titled debut was, in a word, charming. It’s 2006 follow-up, Citrus, was, in another word, breathtaking (and I believe an easy pick for best album of 2006). Most bands would be happy to have just those words, but this band has garnered many more: “electric,” “judicious,” “succulent” and “charismatic,” among many others. How many more positive things can one say about a band? It seems to make sense, then, that not as many wonderful things are being said about the band’s new album, Hush. After all, where do you go once you get to the top of the mountain, like Asobi Seksu did with Citrus?

In retrospect, two options seem obvious. Both involve a step downward in quality, because there was no way they were going to trump Citrus, no matter what. Option one involves doing more of the same glittery shoegaze that we love, and getting blasted for not doing anything different. Option two involves dressing down their sound to something more subdued, and that is exactly what core members Yuki Chikudate and James Hanna do on Hush.

What this does is test their songwriting ability by leaving it to be the main attraction of the album. The tunes here are, instead of empowered and youthful like on Citrus, serious and contemplative. Also, the band switch from big room-filling My Bloody Valentine-esque shoegaze to more elegant Cocteau Twins-esque dreampop. The appearance of Chikudate on the cover might match this sound, as it did on the previous albums. More often than not, this new sound works, and we once again get the feeling that these musicians really are quite talented. Some songs, namely “Layers” and “Transparence,” find the band playing more charmingly simple music that works because they know how to match their new icy dreampop sound with simple melodies.

Without their sonic dress-up, Chikudate’s lyrics now reveal themselves as actually being a lot like Hannah’s. When he sang on songs like “Pink Cloud Tracing Paper” on Citrus, Hannah sounded shy, but that sort of shy vocal style that we find kind of cute. We got a taste of that from Chikudate too, but on Hush just about all of the vocals are like this, restrained. We want them to be brave and shout out, but they never seem to. In terms of instrumentation, they make similar conscious refrains. We do get hints of the reverb that we have heard from them in the past, but sometimes we can barely even hear any guitar (“Gliss”). The end product is ultimately very reserved, and we get the feeling that if we accompanied these songs with the self-assured sonic hugeness that the band had claimed previously, we’d get a lot more truly memorable songs.

And in fact, they do this exactly once, on the album’s first single, “Me & Mary.” The song sounds like a Citrus outtake, and it proves that their songwriting ability is still outwardly excellent if it is presented with this vitality. The rest of the album screams out to be fully expressed like “Me & Mary,” particularly on songs like “Familiar Light,” “Gliss,” and “Glacially.” It’s as if they are giving us a taste of what they could really accomplish should they decide to re-introduce the muscular production they once used, but its conscious shedding takes away something really important. The “Exotic Animal Paradise” we heard on Citrus may still be here, but it is deliberately obscured to the point where it is barely cognizable.

The most interesting thing about Hush is that it wears its sound and potential weaknesses on its sleeves. This could be seen as very empowering. We don’t have to search for an all-encompassing adjective here. It is provided for us. “Hush” was the logical next step, but there was more than one option. A very telling fact springs from the title of the album’s only instrumental interlude, “Risky and Pretty.” Asobi Seksu are good at being pretty, and they don’t have to be risky to be successful. The self titled album and Citrus were both accessible, loveable albums, and this one had the potential to be as much. The decision to make a sound change wasn’t necessarily a damning idea, but the risk they decided to take feels more like a calculated business decision. “Risky” would have been to not be afraid to stick with what works. But it should be said that Asobi Seksu make the sound switch fairly intelligently despite its inherent shortcomings, and they also still know how to write catchy tunes. So Hush will please fans, but it isn’t anywhere near the quality of its predecessors. But even if it was a complete disaster, I would have still bought tickets to see Asobi Seksu on March 28th. I haven’t given up on this band’s capability to make excellent albums. They are two for three, after all, so they have earned the benefit of the doubt as well as my encouragement as a fan to try whatever kind of sound they please.

Asobi Seksu

Asobi Seksu