Posts Tagged ‘progressive rock’

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Off This Century – My Favorite Albums of 2000-2009

December 25, 2009
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Mew – No More Stories / Are Told Today / I'm Sorry / They Washed Away // No More Stories / The World Is Grey / I'm Tired / Let's Wash Away

September 12, 2009

I don’t have a lot of energy right now, as it is late and I am back late from a show, but I am now listening to this album and feel that it deserves a shout out. So I’m going to give my incomplete, unedited take on it.

mew_no_more_stories

As the year progresses, more and more albums are catching my ear that impress me. I’ll be blunt by saying that No More Stories… is one of those albums. It is different from Mew’s previous LP, And The Glass Handed Kites (which, man, came out four years ago already?) in that it is very much a set of songs as opposed to a long suite. Each song is individual and memorable. This is due in part to Mew’s frequent tendency to experiment a little, and thus we get songs like “New Terrain” (which when played backwards reveals a completely different song. what’s shocking is that both songs are actually good), “Introducing Palace Players” (a fractured, no-tempo stomp), and “Cartoons and Macrame Wounds” (which begins at it’s climax and works backwards). These songs are pretty out there at first listen, but give them a little time and the pieces click into place and they are ultimately enticing. They are just new and different enough to be fascinating but they also have more conventional, melodic elements to them, and Mew are very good at melody. The album isn’t all experimentalism though; there are a couple more streamlined tunes here, but they aren’t by any means radio pop. “Repeaterbeater” reminisces of “Apocalypso” off of Glass Handed Kites in that it is shamelessly riffy hard rock. I’ll put another thing bluntly. This album is loaded. It’s got a lot of really memorable songs, and really no bad songs. Even the longer, downtempo pieces (“Silas the Magic Car,” “Cartoons and Macrame Wounds”) are top notch chamber dream pop despite being a little less involving. After maybe two listens, everything here is as familiar and excellent sounding as on Mew’s previous albums. The selection of songs that are excellent here is pretty overwhelming. Besides what I’ve already mentioned, “Beach,” “Hawaii Dream” (the album’s centerpiece, a tiny interlude. how funny that it ends up being one of the more memorable tracks on the album.), “Hawaii” (this one is just perfect, a charming tropical pop song complete with marimbas and skybound reverberating vocals), and “Sometimes Life Isn’t Easy” are all instantly classic Mew. And on the latter, Mew manage to match their awesome guest spot from J Mascis on Glass Handed Kites’ “Why Are You Looking Grave” with a showstopping performance from Mari Helgerlikova, an 88 year old Danish avant-garde singer. Basically, get this album for Christ’s sake. Mew make music that is, like much great art, just new and interesting enough to be engaging, but isn’t too far out. They are completely unabashed in their pop and rock sensibilities while still having the bravery to utilize conventions of many of their favorite genres such as shoegaze, dream pop, progressive rock and even classical pop. You could make a pretty good case that this is Mew’s best album to date. I can hear the complaint already that some might think that this album is tired, but it aknowledges this in it’s title, and knows it. Life can be weary and overbearing but finding refuge in quality music, whether it is music you can rock out to or curl up on the couch with, is pure satisfaction.

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Dream Theater – Score DVD

September 29, 2007

I had the privilege of seeing Dream Theater play in Chicago during the 2007 Systematic Chaos tour. I am not even that huge of a fan of Dream Theater, but I will admit, I got my ass kicked by that concert. It was just one of those concerts that everyone should go see just because of the technical proficiency involved in the playing. Even if you find it hard to sit through a Dream Theater album, a Dream Theater concert will rock your face off. John Petrucci was, as always a beast, and his solos were top notch, faster and more blistering than usual. As a bass player, my eyes are always half glued to the axe wielder, and John Myung is an intense player, always standing stationary like some kind of ghostly brigger nailing out progressive grooves on his massive six string. I don’t think I need to say how ridiculous drummer Mike Portnoy is. He has to be one of the greatest drummers ever. His stage presence is massive, if nothing else, because his kit seems to take up half the stage anyway. Keyboard player Jordan Rudess is probably the least rocking member of the band, mostly because he spends most of his time on stage either reinforcing Petrucci’s already powerful chords or producing some cheesy, unnecessary solos of his own. But I was still impressed with his various keytar solos, even though they lasted far longer than they should have. He is the weakest link, if Dream Theater even has one. I used to think James LaBrie was the weakest member of the band. His vocals always annoyed me. But at that concert, he was impressive. His voice has not declined in twenty years, and he brings a certain amount of clarity to the music.

Despite the fact that Dream Theater are a rock band, they do have that clarity about them. Which is a big reason why people dislike them. Even for a progressive rock band, they always sound clean cut. They have the long, cheesy, cliche solos. LaBrie is, in many respects, too good of a singer and is not interesting in his delivery. Either you appreciate Dream Theater, or you don’t. Either you find them entertaining or trashy, both reasonable opinions.

So if you don’t like Dream Theater, this won’t convince you of anything, except maybe that they know how to produce a concert well. If you do like Dream Theater, Score is an asset, more so than any other bootleg or DVD, just because this is the band at their tightest and best sounding, with their most rounded set to date. If you don’t know Dream Theater, I guess this is as close as you can get to a greatest hits, because this is a 20th Anniversary concert and the band stretches out their entire career into the set.

But you have to consider two things here…The music and the video. You can buy the Score 3 CD set or the 2 DVD set.

For listening, Score is a real winner for Dream Theater fans. The setlist is really balanced. The first portion of the concert contains songs from the bands first ten years or so, hitting favorite numbers such as The Root Of All Evil, Under A Glass Moon, and the power ballad classic The Spirit Carries On. If you are the kind of person that appreciates that signature Dream Theater cheesy solo heroism, you will find some really good stuff here. After the first set, the Octavarium Orchestra is introduced, a full orchestra that accompanies the band for the rest of their set, for two disks, playing massive epics such as the forty minute long Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence, Octavarium, Metropolis, and some other good ones. The orchestra adds an extra level of talent and puts new angles on all of the songs. Their inclusion is the most appreciated part of the concert. The music here is great for what it is.

But what I found while watching the DVD was… It was a task. I mean, it was impressive, but there isn’t much to see, except all the solos. The show is so massive that it is really hard to hold ones attention through the whole thing unless you are big enough of a fan to recognize all the songs. I am not THAT big of a fan. And to be honest, each Dream Theater song develops in so many different directions that no matter how much I listen to them, I doubt I will ever become truly acquainted with their catalog. It’s not that Dream Theater are a band that you either love or hate. Of the ten people who I saw the concert with, only two of them were truly fans, and the rest of us just casual listeners. We really liked the concert. And if you like Dream Theater, you really should see them, because their live experience is half of what makes the band who they are. The energy of the concerts are really amazing. There is no replacement for hearing those opening bass licks of Panic Attack and just watching the whole venue light on fire with enthusiasm. When you are in the middle of them, Dream Theater concerts are fast, relentless, impressive. Pretty damn metal.

But I didn’t get much of that excitement from the Score DVD. You really have to be there to feel the energy. The visual component of Dream Theater is the live shows, but it only works if you are actually there. It’s really something I can’t explain any better, the energy just doesn’t translate to recording. Watching the band do what they do best on DVD boils down to one succinct advantage. You can sit on your ass and watch the carnage. It’s just not the same though. Especially this concert. It’s just to well produced, too perfect to feel like an authentic, dirty, dark rock and roll show. And besides, if you aren’t actually there, what you will be watching from a DVD like this is just what the musicians are doing with their hands, and your mind could have filled in those blanks anyway. I guess you can say that about any band though. In any case, the DVD didn’t impress me that much.

For the music, Score is a real winner. You can’t argue with a thirty piece orchestra doing that much collective damage and sounding completely tight, playing with the worlds finest progressive rock band. It adds a whole new angle to the music. But for the DVD, save your cash unless you are a big fan. If you are a casual fan like me and want to relive the concert experience a little more accurately, there are better options. I enjoyed it, but not THAT much, not more than Budokan anyway. A good release from a good band that won’t please everyone.